wiki:CA-Process-for-IAcatalogers

Interference Archive Guide to Cataloging with CollectiveAccess

Logging in to CollectiveAccess

Log in to the backend of Interference Archive's CollectiveAccess database at https://catalog.interferencearchive.org/admin

If it’s your first time using the catalog, have someone with an admin user account help you to create a new user name. Each cataloger has their own user name and password. This helps distinguish which cataloger has done what work.

Your user name and password will be set by an administrator; only administrators have the ability to change user passwords.

For administrators: to create new user accounts go to Manage --> Access Control in the drop-down menu, and create a new account. When creating an account, be sure to add the new user to the correct user group:

  • a cataloger is the general role for anyone who wants to cataloger
  • an accessioner needs access to Collective Access only to do preliminary steps in the processing workflow for new acquisitions
  • a donor info manager and an administrator have much more control and access to information in the database; both of these, especially the donor info manager, are applied much less often than other roles.

(Please note that a single user can be added to multiple user groups.)

General notes about using CollectiveAccess:

  • If CollectiveAccess sits idle for too long, it may automatically sign you out. Generally, the system is designed to make frequent changes before you can continue work on new pages, but it is smart to save your work often.

Cataloging Workflow

Before you start: read through this documentation to get a feel for what you'll be doing.

Be the change you want to see in [these cataloging instructions.] Which is to say: if something doesn't make sense in these instructions, ask for clarification, and then please fix and edit these instructions as you see fit!

You can log in to this wiki at the top right of the page with OpenID. Just click "OpenID" for instructions:

Find an object to catalog.

How do you know what to catalog next?

  • You can choose a subject that is of interest to you and catalog items which are related to the topic - this could be come a "Collection Subject Guide" in the catalog.
  • Or you could start with cataloging materials that have been used in exhibitions; there is already contextual information and bibliographies written for these materials, so it would be less research for you as the cataloger.
  • Another option would be to choose an archival collection to "process". This includes collections of materials that were donated by one individual or group. An "accession number" is assigned to each of these collections in our database and a new "Lot" is created for it in the database. The accession number should be written somewhere on all of the physical objects in these kinds of collections.

As you catalog

Don't be afraid to really get to know the item you're cataloging. If it is in a bag - for example, a zine or t-shirt or newspaper - please take it out so that you can look at it more closely.

If you are confused about what kind of information to include in a field, hover your cursor over the title of the field and (for most fields) a hover-box will appear with information will appear to guide you.

How much information does each record need?

When cataloging an object, leave fields in the record blank if you don’t have the information to fill them correctly, or if the options generated in an automatic menu are not suitable.

Each record should contain a title for the object - either a title that is on the object, or a title made up by the cataloger. If possible, add at least one more of the following: a date, place, or person associated with the object, OR one or more subject terms.

Cataloging for Accessibility

Our plan is to make our catalog as usable as possible, and to help catalog users find everything they might need. This means that the way information is entered in the catalog depends on front-end searchability. Because our catalog's front-end is still under development, we're not 100% sure how some fields will be searchable. At this point, we've tried to indicate which fields work best with free text entry, with date formatting, etc.

If you need to log out before you finish - for example, to take a break or to come back and finish cataloging another day - make sure you set the record's Status to EDITING IN PROGRESS, and Access is set at NOT ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC (more on this below, here and here).

Get started: Adding records to the catalog

From the backend of CollectiveAccess, choose NEW from the menu bar across the top, and select the type of record you want to create from the drop-down menu.

There are several record types you can create within CollectiveAccess: Objects, Entities, Places, Lots, Storage Locations, Collections, Interference Archive events, and Loans.

Most often, you will pick New --> Object --> [and then select a type of Object], but you might also have to create new records for these other types.

If you are interested in exploring the other record types you can create from the "New" menu, A complete glossary of all these record types is included in Appendix A

Cataloging an Object: Object Record tab

Most of the time you will be creating new "object" records in the database. An "object" is the term used for any thing in the collection. Objects may be physical or digital items, or many items which have been intellectually grouped together (archival collections and series). For our purposes we have three kinds of objects- meaning three record levels to choose from: Archival Collection, Series, and Item.

Archival Collection are collections which were created or belonged to one person or group (such as personal or organizational papers); or, subject files of various formats of ephemera related to one issue or event (which have been collected by one person, or many people and put together to form an artificial collection). Archival collections are similar to "lots" in the sense,that they may originate from one person's collection, but lots are not made public through the database. Archival collections usually contain multiple items which could be spread throughout various storage locations in Interference Archive, and contain different kinds of formats. For those familiar with archiving, this is a high level record and could be thought of as a "finding aid".

Since an archival collection contains many objects, for the sake of time, if you do not want to create individual records for all of the objects in a collection, you create a general description of what the collection contains. Later, if you want to create a more detailed record for each item in the collection, you can, and relate these item records to the archival collection record.

In the description field for an archival collection, please include information such as: The scope and contents of the collection, biographical and historical information related to the collection, and any information about how the items are arranged if relevant. See here for an example:http://dlib.nyu.edu/findingaids/html/tamwag/photos_201/index.html

Example: Dara Greenwald Papers
Example: 2004 Republican National Convention Protests Collection

Series records are also high level records which refer to multiple items. Use this record type to represent many issues of a serial publication or several objects which are part of a series- such as works of art.(Examples: magazines, zines, journals, newspapers, newsletters, calendars, a multi-volume book series, artworks in a series). You can create individual item records if you wish and relate them back to the series record.

Item records refer to one object, or a group of objects which are associated or grouped together intellectually. Examples: a book, a portfolio of prints (do not create "series" records for portfolios), a deck of cards.

Begin the cataloging process by selecting the kind of object record you want to create.

Click: New --> Object --> Choose object type.

How to change your record's Object Type

You might realize, after creating a record for an object mistakenly as a "item", that you actually want to catalog it as a "series". To change the object type of your record, look at the record's information box near the top left of your screen:

At the right of "Editing Item", and above the image of an eye, click on the square with curly corners (the same symbol that appears on your computer's Command key).



This will provide a popup box that allows you to change the object type:

Now that you've generated a form to catalog an Object, look at the Navigation Tabs at the left of your screen. These point to different forms, as shown below:

Begin by selecting the Object Record tab, which takes you to the form for an object’s main database record. You won't be able to click on the other tabs yet, but they will become active after you have saved the record for the first time.

The Object Record tab is the place where you can enter most of the descriptive or bibliographic information about the object.

How much information does each record need?

When cataloging an object, leave fields in the record blank if you don’t have the information to fill them correctly, or if the options generated in an automatic menu are not suitable. Each record should contain a title for the object - either a title that is on the object, or a title made up by the cataloger - as well as at least one of the following: a date, place, or person associated with the object, OR one or more subject terms.

Status: Keeping track of your workflow

It's a good idea to track your workflow as you add to and edit your record. You may want to go back to it later, or have someone review it. The Status function allows you to document where you are at in the workflow process.

If you are partially done with cataloging an item and want to continue working later, set Status to EDITING IN PROGRESS.

If you want someone to review your work, set the status to EDITING COMPLETE.

Set the status to COMPLETED once the record is ready to be made public.

Access: Is this record public or not?

The Access function allows you to make a record visible on the frontend or public side of the database, or keep it private in the backend of the database.

While you are in the process of editing the record, make sure the access is set to NOT ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC.

Change this to make ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC once you are finished entering information and editing the record, and it will show up on the frontend of the database.

Metadata Fields in the Object Record

Object Identifier

This numerical ID will be automatically generated by CollectiveAccess. It is an id which refers to the database record. As you catalog you can record this number on a label and affix it to each item's container, or write it on the item itself so that the the record and item are linked.

For Moving Images: Once you have saved an item in Collective Access, take a label or a piece of artist’s tape and write the unique identifying letters and number on the tape. For videotapes, put the label with the ID number below the videocassette label. Do not cover the clear tape window or any existing labels. For optical media like CDs and DVDs, affix the piece of the tape to the case, NOT the disc itself. Labels on discs can damage them. For videocassettes you may also want to put a label with the ID number on the box as well. You may be able to write the ID number directly on some boxes with a pencil.

Title

Enter the title of the object. The title of an object might be obvious if it is a published work, but in many cases it will be necessary to create a title. There will be instances when you will want to include more than one title! The first title you use will be the main title or the one that displays on the front end. All additional titles you add or "alternate titles" will be searchable but will not display on the front end.

Titles may be derived from their subject content or iconography. For instance, if the object you are cataloging is a poster depicting only a raised fist coming out of a woman symbol, you might title the object, "Raised fist woman symbol".

Titles may include references to the owners of works, places where they were used, or their context. For example, a flyer for an event for a May Day demonstration might be titled, "May Day demonstration 2012".

The title might also be derived from text found on an object: for example if the text on the poster says "No More Nukes", this phrase could be used as the title.

Descriptive titles may include a description of the physical object in square brackets, for example, "Guy Fawkes [mask]". This is useful for objects that do not have published titles.

Capitalization: in general feel free to copy the capitalization that is used in the title as it appears on the object. Capitalize only the first word of the title in the case of non-published title. Please capitalize any proper nouns.

Title Type

It is not required to include a title type but here are some examples of when clarifying the type of title being used is important:

  • The title was made up by the cataloger- and not the creator or publisher of the object.
  • The object has no "official" title but is commonly referred to in some way.
  • The title came from some other source other than the creator or publisher.
  • The title has been translated from its original language.
  • The title given by the creator of the object is "Untitled" but you wish to make it more discoverable in our database by creating a descriptive title.

Select from the title type drop-down menu to express whether the title was derived from the object itself or the creator of the object (as in the case for many publications or works of art), or if the title was constructed by you as the cataloger.

Title types

  • published - if you are cataloging an object that was published with a given title, mark the "published" title type. Use this type for a moving image item that was mass-produced and has the title printed on the box.
  • creator - if the creator of the object has supplied you with a title that does not exist on the object itself, select the "creator" title.
  • descriptive - if you are cataloging an anti-nuclear banner and you choose to give it the title "Anti-nuclear [banner]", select the "descriptive" title type.
  • former - an object may have both a current and former title. If you know the former title, add it to alternative titles and mark its type as "former". This is prevalent in the case of periodicals like magazines which may have changed title over time. If you are cataloging an issue that bears the former title, and you are aware that the title has changed, mark this title with the "former" title type.
  • inscribed - use this title type if the title you have entered is inscribed - which is to say, written or typed- on the object. You can use this title type for a moving image item if the title has been written by hand on the tape, or disc or if the title is written on a handmade case.
  • other - use this title type for all other types of titles.
  • owner - use this title type if the title you are using was given to you by the object's owner/former owner, if that title does not appear on the object itself.
  • popular - use this title type for a title that does not appear on the object itself but that the object is commonly known by. If the object has another title marked on it, enter the popular title in the "Alternate title" field.
  • repository - if an object's title is specific to Interference Archive and you are using it, mark the title type as "repository"
  • translated - if the title you're using on the record is translated from the original language of the title on the object, select "translated" as the title type.
  • series - if the title you've used is a title for a series such as a group of artworks that are given one title like series of posters called "Celebrate Peoples' History" select "series" as the title type.
  • uniform - uniform titles are used when an object has appeared under more than one title- such as in a work that has been translated or when an title has been changed many times. A uniform title is a means to connect all the different titles together.

Alternate Title

This is the place to enter any title that is used for the object in addition to the main title which will be displayed.

For example, a book may have one title on the cover and a different title on the inside title page, such as the inclusion of a subtitle.

This field could also be used to record the translation of the title in another language other than the one used in the "Title" field. If you are cataloging one issue of a periodical, you can record the "uniform title" of the work here.

Again, choose the appropriate “Title Type”.

Examples:

  • The Dispossessed (title)
  • The Dispossessed: An ambiguous utopia (alternate title with subtitle included)

Enumeration and Chronology

This field is available for "series" and "item" records only.

  • This is required for cataloging serial publications (items which are published sequentially over time) including such items as periodicals, newspapers, zines, or calendars.
  • This can be used when cataloging one item within a group or set, for example one volume in a set of books.

When cataloging a serial publication either as an individual item record or numerous items in a series, use this field to record information which indicates the order of the item within a series. For periodicals and serials it can refer to volumes and/or issue numbers, (which is called enumeration), and the year(s) and/or any seasonal information (which is called chronology). If you are creating one "series" record for numerous issues of a publication, repeat this field for each issue in the series.

For Moving Images: If multiple moving image items are part of a series, add an entry to this field. Note the volume or part number, for example “part 1 of 3.”

Edition

This field is available for "series" and "item" records only.

This field is not required, but can be used to describe the issuance of a work in relation to previous or subsequent editions. Example: 2nd edition

This field can be used for works issued in multiples like posters and prints, with the number assigned to a particular item within a specific edition or production run. Example: 5/50

This field can also give information about the edition. Example: Special edition

It is useful to record this information if known because it allows you to distinguish various editions of the same work.

Date

This is the place to enter a date or date range associated with the creation, publication, or exhibition of the work. If you are unsure of the date associated with an object, you may approximate using "circa" or ca. before the date or date range. For a complete list of acceptable date formats see the Collective Access wiki here: http://docs.collectiveaccess.org/wiki/Date_and_Time_Formats

Examples:

  • ca. 1940
  • 1940 - 1950
  • May 1940

At present, it is not possible to list date as a season - for example, "Autumn". Do not record information pertaining to the issue or volume of a periodical here. This goes in the Enumeration and Chronology field (above).

Note: The small calendar at the right end of this data entry field is not a calendar that you can click on and select a date; it is merely there to indicate that text entered in this field will be computed as a date, and not as free text.

For Moving Images: Choose “published” in the drop down menu for “date type” if you are entering the date an item was released publicly. Usually the date released can be found on the item’s box or the disc or tape itself. You may also want to add a separate date and use the type “created” if you know the date that the work itself was created.

Date Type

There is a list of choices if you would like to specify the type of date you have entered:

  • created - use this for the date when the object was originally created or the date(s) that an event or image was captured in some material form.
  • bulk - use this for the date pertaining to the majority of the objects being described if differing significantly from the inclusive dates. Use only when inclusive dates are specified.
  • designed - use this for the date when the object was designed.
  • exhibition - use this for the date(s) when the object was exhibited.
  • performed - use this for the date(s) an object was performed or used in performance.
  • published - use this for the date when an object was commercially issues or mass produced.
  • view - use this for the date when an image was captured (use this date type for image records ONLY).

If you want to add more than one date, for example an “exhibition” as well as a “creation” date, click “Add date” under the “Date type” box:

Creators and Contributors

This is the field for the people, groups, families, or corporations that are responsible for the creation of an object. They are categorized as "Individuals" (people), "Organizations" (any collective body whether it is an artists' collective or a corporation), and "Family" (a group of people known by their familial name Ex: Jones family).

Entities have different "roles" they play in the creation of a work (Ex: author, artist, printer, etc.), or may have contributed to an object in some way even if they are not the person primarily responsible for it's creation (Ex: distributor, producer, or publisher)

Enter the name of each entity connected to this work and wait a moment while the spinning wait cursor shows that the database is searching to see if this entity already exists in the database.

If this entity exists in the catalog, select them as they appear.

Creators and Contributors: Types

An additional menu will pop up to the right of the entity you just selected, allowing you to choose this entity’s role, or their relationship to the object. Your choices are:

  • artist - use this for the creator of a visual or audio-visual object.
  • attributed to - A person believed to have written or created a work published anonymously or that is of doubtful authorship. Attribution is usually based on supporting evidence, which should be indicated in the “source of information” area (see below).
  • author - The person or corporate entity responsible for writing an object.
  • contributor - One of several persons, each of whom is involved in the creation of a work, but might not be the entity who is primarily responsible for its production.
  • creator - the individual or organization responsible for creating, or producing the object.
  • designer - the entity responsible for the design of an object.
  • director - The person who has overall responsibility for controlling and supervising the performance of a work.
  • distributor - the entity responsible for disseminating the object to the public.
  • editor - A person who prepares for publication the work(s) of one or more other authors. An editor may be responsible for selecting material included in a collection or for preparing manuscript copy for the printer. This person could also be the picture or sound editor of a work.
  • illustrator - a person who draws or creates pictures for magazines, books, advertising, etc
  • printer - The person or organization that prints a book, pamphlet, periodical, poster, etc. which can be distinguished from the publisher who issues the object and the distributor who disseminates it.

For Moving Images: Moving image works can often have hundreds of contributors. Don’t worry about cataloging every single cast and crew member, just include any that you feel are important or that someone might search for. There are several types of creators and contributors that specifically apply to moving image items listed below:

  • cast - any actors, actresses, or performers featured in the item. In the case of many video art pieces where the person onscreen is also the writer and director you can choose the "artist" type instead of adding the same person multiple times with different roles.
  • crew - the people who worked on an technical aspect of production of the item. This includes people like cinematographers, videographers, camera operators, grips, and sound recordists.
  • production company - the company or organization that produced the original work. This may or may not be the same organization as the "distributor" which makes the work available on formats like DVD or VHS.

Feel free to use any of the other types such as "director," "editor," or "distributor" if you feel they apply. If you are unsure of someone's role in a work you can use the "contributor" type.

Creating new "Related Creators and Contributors"

If the entity you need does not exist in the catalog, click CREATE

  • A pop-up window will open for you to enter the entity.
  • Quick Add setting: choose Individual, Family, or Organization, as applicable to your entity.
  • Enter the preferred and alternate names of the entity.
  • If you are entering an Organization, make sure you enter the organization's entire name in the Surname field.
  • In Access, make sure to click ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC
  • Set Status to COMPLETED

Click “Add relationship” under your first entity to add more related entities, including all publishers/authors/creators/artists/etc. for this object.

For a journal with multiple authors (for example, for each chapter), this is the place to add each contributing author.

Place of Creation, Publication, or Distribution

Use this field for places connected to the creation, publication, or distribution of an object. Begin by typing at least three letters; wait a moment while the spinning wait cursor shows that the database is searching to see if a record for this place already exists in the database.

An additional menu will pop up to the right of the entity you just selected, allowing you to choose this place’s relationship or to the object. You can indicate whether this was the place the object was "created", "published", "distributed".

Creating new Related Place records

If the place you need does not exist in the expanding menu, you will be asked if you want to create a record for this place. Click CREATE to bring up the appropriate pop-up window.

  • At the top left, on the "Quick Add" drop down menu, and choose whether this place is an autonomous region, city, continent, country, former nation, location, neighborhood, region, state, or territory.
  • In "Access", be sure to click "Accessible to Public"
  • Choose the correct spot in the "Location in Hierarchy" table. For example, don't select "North America" if you are creating a record for Brooklyn. Select "North America >> United States >> New York".
  • To avoid errors with creating a new place: Ensure you select a place in the Hierarchy selector, or create an "autonomous place"

If you need to create multiple places in the hierarchy - for example, first the state and then the city, please do this.

NOTE: To open this menu, click the grey arrow to the right of the words “Places”, not the words themselves. This list is intended to be hierarchically structured, so countries are nested within continents, and cities within countries, etc.

  • Enter the name of the place you want to display to the public as the preferred term, but also enter "Alternate Names" or other commonly used names or abbreviations for the place that a searcher might try to use, or common misspellings. For example, New York might have alternate names NY and NYC.

Description

Describe the object, noting its subject matter and content, historical context, or an interpretation of the work. Include info that gives additional information not recorded in other fields in the record. If the object has written or printed inscriptions, titles, signatures, stamps, marks, initials, or dates, or edition numbers, bookplates, collector's marks, or annotations, indicate what they are and look like, who wrote them (if known), and where they are located on the object.
Example: Signed, dated, and numbered by artist, bottom right corner.

This text appears publicly in the online catalog. This field is optional, and is only necessary if you have time and interest in doing additional research about the object.

If the information you enter in this field comes from specific source of information such as a book, or a website, or info provided by the donor please include a citation in this field after your description.

For Moving Images: Transcribe the description from the item’s box or from another source (such as IMDB). Note your source, writing either “item's container” or pasting in the URL. If known, you can also include technical information here such as whether the image is in black and white or color, whether the item has a stereo or mono soundtrack, or is silent, the aspect ratio of the image, or which television standard the image is presented in (such as NTSC or PAL). If known, you can also include information about whether this is a master tape or a duplicate.

Table of Contents information

The "Description" field can also be used to add the Table of Contents from a publication or a list of songs in the case of an audio recording. If you would like to do this, simply list the contents into this field. You can format them as a bullet or numbered list.

Language

List the language(s) of this object.

It is possible to add multiple languages by clicking the “Add language” button. Capitalize the first letter of the word.
Example: Spanish

For Moving Images: Add as many languages as are available/spoken for the moving image item. In the case of subtitles, additionally list the language of subtitles. For example, if the DVD has French and Spanish audio tracks and English and German subtitles you would add “French” “Spanish” “English” and “German.”

Format

This field expresses the type of textual, graphic, electronic, or physical item you are cataloging. It is a required field. It is not a free text field, but is connected to a controlled vocabulary- a list of terms that is already in the database. If you think that the object you are cataloging can be described as multiple formats, include more than one. For example, if the object you are cataloging is a zine but ALSO a comic, you can record both formats. Or if the object has some additional materials that accompany it, for example, it is a book with a cd of images, then you could categorize it as multi-media, book, and sound recording. You can also type in the name of a specific moving image format, such as “VHS” or “DVD.” The name of the format should appear in a drop down list when you finish typing.

Examples:

multi-media, book, sound recording, VHS, DVD

A complete glossary of all the formats is listed in Appendix B

Measurements

List measurements that are relevant to the object.

This is a free-text field.

The measurements you specify may include: area, base, bit-depth (for born-digital work), circumference, count, depth, diameter, distance between, duration, file size (for born-digital work), height, length, resolution (for born-digital work), running time, scale (for maps), size, target (for use with scale), weight, and width.

For example, you might specify:

  • dimensions for posters and prints
  • running time for time based media (sound recordings and moving images)
  • page counts for books
  • diameter for buttons
  • the size of a t-shirt (small, medium, large, extra large)

The units used in the measurement should be specified - inches, centimeters, pages, minutes, etc. and you may use appropriate abbreviations. These units can be abbreviated, such as "11 cm x 12 cm", or "1 hour, 6 min."

You can also include the count of something, such as the number of volumes in a set of books, or number of prints in a portfolio.

It is possible to click “Add measurements” to include multiple types of measurements, such as the number of pages in a book, as well as the height and width of the book.

For Moving Images: Use one entry in this field for the running time of the film or video. Often the running time can be found on the container or the item itself. When writing the running time use the abbreviations "hr" (for hour) "min" (for minute) and "sec" (for second). Remember that this is the running time of the actual movie or video not the full capacity of the tape or DVD itself. Add another entry for “measurements and extent.” Fill in the measurements of the item’s container or case. Do not fill in the measurements for the tape or disc unless its size is extremely unusual. In this case, add another measurement and fill in the dimensions of the disc or tape.

Materials and techniques

If you can, identify the materials used in the creation of a work. Also indicate any known production or manufacturing techniques, processes, or methods used for creation.

Example: 2-color screen print on blue, acid free, matte paper.

Subject Terms

We are not using a controlled vocabulary like the Library of Congress Subject Headings (however, you could refer to it if you would like). We are interested in developing a list of subject terms based the vocabularies of activists, cultural producers, and participants in movement work. Choose some broad and narrow subject terms that you think apply to this object.

For example a pamphlet about labor strikes published by the IWW, might be about "Unions", "Strikes", "Labor strikes", and "Labor" If you are unsure, leave this field blank, or search for similar objects in the catalog and see what subject terms have been used for these.

The terms other people have used are stored in the database. If you begin typing at least three letters of a subject term; wait for the spinning wait cursor, and a list of terms other people have used will generate. You can select your term from this list or create a new one.

In general, use natural and intuitive language for subject terms. People who are searching the catalog will approach the search box with natural and intuitive language. As a rule for people as subjects: enter individual names as "Last Name, First Name". (For example: Brown, Charlie)

To add more than one subject term: Add your first subject term, and then click "+add subject term" below the original field to generate another subject tag field for your second subject. Continue adding fields for as many subject terms as you need. Do not add all your subject terms in one field, separated by commas.

Feel free to use multiple subject terms, but please limit yourself; use your judgement, but please try not to use more than 7 tags.

Share your subject terms on our wiki as well: Browse https://catalog.interferencearchive.org/issues/wiki/subjectlist to see what subject terms are being used, and add the subject terms you've used as you catalog.

This way, you can easily check to see if you've chosen a popular term that will allow for good browsing, or to check which of several terms you're considering has been used most.

Holdings

Holdings refers to the number of copies of an item in the entire collection of Interference Archive. If there are 2 copies of the same book, you can state "2 copies". If you are cataloging a series record and have listed multiple issues of a newspaper, and there are more than one copy of an issue you may write "1 copy of v.11,1989-v.88,2010; 2 copies of v.1-10, 2010"

References

This field is optional.

Provide a reference to the source of the information for your cataloging record.

This may be a citation to the sole source of the information - for example, a WorldCat record, or information from another website.

For an image, this field may be used to provide information about the supplying agency, vendor or individual who donated the image and who was able to provide descriptive information about the image.

This field may also refer to the individual who donated an object and supplied details about it, or to the donation information sheet they may have filled out when donating the object.

Catalogers Notes

Note any questions or issues you have, but try not to use this unless absolutely necessary. If you have a question or problem, please ask someone.

Cataloging an Object: Remaining left menu tabs

When you have saved your record the tabs on the left side menu are activated, and you can move to these next steps.

Relationships Tab

Click on the Relationships screen

  1. Related objects – Here you can link this object to other objects: for example objects in a series, another version of the work, a text that describes a work of art, or a print that is part of a portfolio set.

Begin typing at least three letters of a related object's title to retrieve other cataloged objects that are related to your object. - for example Dus will bring up Dust Tracks on a Road. After you select a related object from the drop-down list that appears, you should also indicate the relationship between objects from the new drop-down menu to the right: how is the object you have just selected related to the object you are cataloging? Your choices are: contains, is preparatory for, has version, describes, is depicted in, is source for, depicts is based on, is derived from, is described in, is duplicate of, is part of, is related to, is version of

  1. Related Collections
  1. Related lot - We record where each object in the collection came from. These acquisitions or donations care called "lots". You can tell an object has been "accessioned" or added to our collection because it has received a "lot" number to identify it. This number tells us information about where the object came from. The accession number is a YYYY-XXX, where Y= the digits of the year, and X is a number signifiying the order in which it was added to the collection. Example: A box of fliers was donated in 2013, and was the 14th lot added to the collection during the year, so its accession number is 2013-014
  1. Related media - Here you can link this record to media that has already been uploaded and linked to another archival collection, item, or series. If the media has not yet been uploaded, do not use this field, but upload it in the Media screen.
  1. Related occurrences -
  1. Related loans -
  1. Sets

For Moving Images: After you are done cataloging the item, click on “relationships” in the left sidebar. Check off the set list called “to be inspected" and click "save." Then return the item to where you found it. If it is a videotape, do not attempt to play the item unless you are skilled in tape inspection. Playing a bad tape in a VCR can damage the heads permanently. CDs and DVDs are usually fine to play as long as the disc isn’t excessively dirty or cracked.

For All Other Items:ignore this field at present. In the future, you may add an object to a SET, which places this additionally on the Gallery page of the catalog’s public web site: ​https://catalog.interferencearchive.org/index.php/simpleGallery/Show/Index There are no sets in existence at present.

  1. hit Return or click Save to save your entry

Media Tab

Now you’re ready to move to the next Navigation Tab at the left of your screen. Click to the Media tab only if a digital image, audio, or moving image file is already available for the record. To add a digital file for display, click Add representation, and then fill in the following basic field:

  1. Type - select either sound recording, still image, or video depending on the file’s format
  1. Status - select Completed
  1. Is primary - select Yes [unless you have multiple images for the object, then pick Yes only for the main image you want to show up in search results]
  1. Access - select Accessible to Public
  1. Upload a File - hit Return or click Save to save your entry

Next, you are ready to add more detailed information about the file. Click the newspaper icon to the left (newspaper icon) after the file has uploaded, and complete the following fields. Remember that these fields describe the digital file only, and not necessarily the object that has been photographed, recorded, filmed, etc.

  1. Representation identifier - use our naming schema, which should match the filename
  1. Label - choose a short descriptive phrase from the drop-down menu that identifies the relationship of the digital file to the work, but not necessarily its thematic content (e.g. “Back cover”)
  1. Source - fill in the creator of the digital file (i.e. who scanned the book), not the original work being imaged or recorded. If a volunteer at Interference Archive digitized the work, put "Interference Archive."

  1. Notes - please include any other relevant information unique to that digital file
  1. Related objects - this field should always link back to the catalog record for the work being imaged/recorded/etc.
  1. Related Interference Archive Event - the same as Related Objects, except for event records

Permissions and Rights Tab

Now you’re ready to move to the next tab at the left of your screen. Permissions and Copyright: in regards to the object you are cataloging, fill this out if permission and copyright information is known.

  1. Rights holder - enter copyright permission in here, if applicable. If rights are held by someone, it is likely one of the creators or distributors of the work.
  1. Rights text - reproduce in this field any specific rights text that you find on the object. For example, the object might say "the author of this work holds copyright and forbids any reproduction of the work", or "This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License"
  1. Rights type - select Copyleft, Copyright, Public Domain, etc. If you do not know, select Undetermined.
  1. Rights HREF - if there is a URL related to the Rights on the object, enter it here. For example, you might want to include a URL to the appropriate Creative Commons license page: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/
  1. Rights note include any additional info about the rights here.
  1. Hit Return or click Save to save your entry

For Moving Images: Check the container or the item for rights statements. If it says “copyright” or there is a © anywhere on the container or item, copy this text exactly into the “Rights text” field.

Storage Location Tab

Now you're ready to move to the next tab at the left of your screen: Storage Location.

Using the hierarchical menu, click on grey arrows to navigate down the hierarchy and select the permanent storage location of the object you are cataloging. Select the shelf, flat file, etc.

Summary Tab

This tab shows all the information you've entered about this object.

Log Tab

This tab gives a record of all the cataloging work that has been done on a record. If you think someone altered your object record, look here!

Finishing Your Work

Complete The Entry: Checking Your Work

Make sure you go back to the top of the "Object Record" tab, and set the record's status to COMPLETED once the record is ready to be made public. Also set access as ACCESSIBLE TO PUBLIC.

Admire the entry you’ve created by checking the public catalog online here:​ https://catalog.interferencearchive.org/index.php/Browse/Index

Done for the Day? Log out before you leave!

When you have completed the entries for the day, make sure to logout of Collective Access scroll all the way to the bottom of the screen, where a blue bar with "your_username --> logout" will appear; click logout


Trouble? Having a problem or finding a technical issue? Let us know here: https://catalog.interferencearchive.org/issues


Appendix A: Glossary of Record Types

This is a glossary of the types of records that can be created in the Interference Archive database. These are all listed on the "New" menu from the backend of CollectiveAccess, and from the submenus of the New menu:

Return to the Cataloging Instructions, above

  1. Lot: A lot is an object or collection of objects that come to the Archive at one point in time, from one donor or event. This object or group of objects is accessioned into the collection as one Lot.
    1. gift - a lot that is freely given to the Archive. This gift includes complete transfer of rights permissions.
    2. loan - a lot that is borrowed for temporary use
    3. purchase - a lot that has been bought by the Archive

Return to the Cataloging Instructions, above

  1. Object: any item within the collection. These may be physical, digitized, or born-digital.

Most of the time you will be creating new "object" records in the database. An "object" is the term used for any thing in the collection. Objects may be physical or digital items, or many items which have been intellectually grouped together (archival collections and series). For our purposes we have three kinds of objects- meaning three record levels to choose from: Archival Collection, Series, and Item.

  1. Archival Collection are collections which were created or belonged to one person or group (such as personal or organizational papers); or, subject files of various formats of ephemera related to one issue or event (which have been collected by one person, or many people and put together to form an artificial collection). Archival collections are similar to "lots" in the sense,that they may originate from one person's collection, but lots are not made public through the database. Archival collections usually contain multiple items which could be spread throughout various storage locations in Interference Archive, and contain different kinds of formats. For those familiar with archiving, this is a high level record and could be thought of as a "finding aid".

Since an archival collection contains many objects, for the sake of time, if you do not want to create individual records for all of the objects in a collection, you create a general description of what the collection contains. Later, if you want to create a more detailed record for each item in the collection, you can, and relate these item records to the archival collection record.

In the description field for an archival collection, please include information such as: The scope and contents of the collection, biographical and historical information related to the collection, and any information about how the items are arranged if relevant. See here for an example:http://dlib.nyu.edu/findingaids/html/tamwag/photos_201/index.html

Example: Dara Greenwald Papers

Example: 2004 Republican National Convention Protests Collection

  1. Series records are also high level records which refer to multiple items. Use this record type to represent many issues of a serial publication or several objects which are part of a series- such as works of art.(Examples: magazines, zines, journals, newspapers, newsletters, calendars, a multi-volume book series, artworks in a series). You can create individual item records if you wish and relate them back to the series record.
  1. Item records refer to one object, or a group of objects which are associated or grouped together intellectually. Examples: a book, a portfolio of prints (do not create "series" records for portfolios), a deck of cards.

Return to the Cataloging Instructions, above

  1. Entities: the individual(s) or corporate bodies responsible for creating intellectual or artistic content, for producing or disseminating the content in physical form, or for maintaining custody of the products
    1. family - a group of related individuals
    2. individual - a single person
    3. organization - an organized body of people with a particular purpose, such as a corporation, society, association, or movement

Return to the Cataloging Instructions, above

  1. Place: the geographic location of an object or entity
  1. Collection: is a subject-based research guide containing objects in the collection.
    1. cultural production -
    2. event -
    3. social movement -

Return to the Cataloging Instructions, above

  1. Interference Archive Event: an incident or event that takes place at the Interference Archive or is organized or endorsed by the Interference Archive
    1. Exhibition:
    2. Film Screening:
    3. Music:
    4. Opening:
    5. Performance:
    6. Talk:
    7. Workshop:

Return to the Cataloging Instructions, above

  1. Storage Location: describes the physical location of the collection.
  1. Loan: this type of record is used to describe an occurrence of objects being loaned into or out of the collection
    1. Loan Out - describes a loan of objects from the Interference Archive collection to another individual or organization
    2. Loan In - describes a loan of objects to the Interference Archive from another individual or organization

Appendix B: Glossary of Formats

  • 3/4-inch - a professional video tape format also known as U-Matic. The width of the magnetic tape inside the cassette is three quarters of an inch. The tape will most likely say U-Matic on it somewhere. Tapes are larger than VHS tapes.
  • 16mm - a strip of motion picture film that is sixteen millimeters in width. It may have perforations on one edge or both edges.
  • armband
  • arpillera- Hand-stitched embroidered needlework pieces from South American Andean countries, used as wall hangings or to make quilts, handbags, pillows, or various other objects.
  • badge
  • bag- Tools, intended for carrying personal articles and sometimes used as clothing accessories. A bag is closed in on all sides except at the top, where also it generally can be closed, and usually having handles or straps for carrying on the shoulder or in the hand.
  • banner- a long strip of material (paper, cloth, etc.) bearing a slogan or design, hung in a public place or carried in a demonstration or procession.
  • Betacam-SP - a professional videotape format, sometimes known as just "betacam" or "beta." The width of the magnetic tape inside the cassette is 1/2 of an inch. The tapes are larger than standard VHS tapes.
  • book - a written or printed work consisting of pages glued or sewn together along one side and bound in covers.
  • bookmark- Devices put between the pages of books to mark a place.
  • button- a badge bearing a design or slogan, to be pinned to clothing
  • calendar
  • card set - a set of cards, either playing cards or collectors' cards
  • CD-ROM - a disc that holds data which is read optically by a CD-ROM drive, CD-ROMs usually contain multimedia such as video files, audio files, or computer programs
  • ceramic tile
  • clippings
  • comic
  • DVD - a consumer video disc format
  • drawing-Visual works produced by drawing, which is the application of lines on a surface, often paper, by using a pencil, pen, chalk, or some other tracing instrument
  • event program- A document outlining the order of and/or background information for an event (meeting, conference, workshop, etc.)
  • exhibition catalog - An exhibition catalog is a printed list of what is on show in an art or other exhibition. It may range in scale from a single printed sheet to a coffed table book
  • flag - a piece of cloth or similar material, typically oblong or square, attachable by one edge to a pole or rope and used as the symbol or emblem of a country, institution, or movement, or as a decoration during public events.
  • flier - a small handbill advertising an event or product.
  • game - board games, video games, and other types of games.
  • hat
  • Hi-8 - a videotape format sometimes known as "eight millimeter video." This is a small tape about the size of an audio cassette.
  • journal - A periodical devoted to disseminating original research and commentary on current developments in a specific discipline, subdiscipline, or field of study.
  • leaflet
  • letters- Pieces of correspondence that are somewhat more formal than memoranda or notes, usually on paper and delivered.
  • map - a diagrammatic representation of an area of land or sea showing physical features, cities, roads, etc.
  • magazine - A popular interest periodical usually containing articles on a variety of topics, written by various authors in a nonscholarly style.
  • mask - A face covering, usually a disguise meant to terrify or amuse.
  • Mini-DV - a digital video tape format
  • money - Anything in general circulation which by common agreement serves as a medium of exchange as payment for goods and services and for the settlement of debts, acts as a measure of value within and between communities, and passes without question or endorsement.
  • matchbook - A matchbook is a small paperboard folder (matchcover) enclosing a quantity of matches and having a coarse striking surface on the exterior.
  • mixed media - Any combination of a variety of materials plus the associated techniques, used in the making of a single work of art. In printmaking, use when more than one technique, such as both etching and engraving, are used in one print.
  • moving image - A series of images which when viewed in rapid succession create the illusion of movement. Moving images may be recorded on film or videotape, or may be born digital. The footage can be edited or unedited.
  • multi-media work- Works of art that employ several distinct art forms, such as zine with a cd of music. To indicate that works are composed of a variety of materials, use "mixed media."
  • newsletter - A serial publication consisting of no more than a few pages, devoted to news, announcements, and current information of interest primarily to a specialized group of subscribers or members of an association or organization who receive it as part of their membership.
  • newspaper - a printed publication (usually issued daily or weekly) consisting of folded unstapled sheets and containing news, feature articles, advertisements, and correspondence.
  • novelty- Refers to small manufactured articles that are decorative or amusing and intended primarily for personal or household use. They are typically characterized by being of little utilitarian value and for being appealing primarily due to their design.
  • painting
  • pamphlet - An independent nonserial publication consisting of a few leaves of printed material stitched together but not bound, usually issued in paper covers. "Pamphlet" is sometimes used synonomously with "brochure" but is usually used for informational purposes (as opposed to brochures for promotional purposes).
  • paper-cut -
  • periodical - a publication that appears at regular intervals, such as weekly or monthly.
  • photograph
  • portrait cloth
  • patch - a piece of cloth sewn onto clothing as a badge or distinguishing mark.
  • postage stamps
  • postcard - a card for sending a message by mail without an envelope, typically having a photograph or other illustration on one side
  • print - a picture or design printed from a block or plate
  • puppet
  • rubber stamp
  • sales catalog - a listing of items available for sale.
  • scarf
  • sculpture
  • screen
  • sign
  • sound recording - A generic term for sound that has been recorded onto a medium designed for playback with the aid of audio equipment. The category includes wax cylinders, phonograph records, audiotapes, compact discs, and the sound track on motion pictures, videorecordings, DVDs, and digital recordings.
  • stencil (image) - Images produced by using sheets of celluloid, cardboard, or other material in which desired lettering or designs have been cut out so that ink or paint applied to the sheets will reproduce the designs on the surface beneath.
  • stencil - (tool)
  • sticker - an adhesive label or notice, generally printed or illustrated.
  • t-shirt - a short-sleeved casual top
  • ticket -
  • VHS - a video tape format played using a VCR
  • zine - a small, low-circulation magazine or newspaper, self-published out of passion for the subject rather than for personal gain, usually produced with the aid of desktop publishing software and high-quality photocopy machines. Zines are usually not available by subscription, often appear irregularly or infrequently, and may have a lifetime of only one or two issues.

SOURCE NOTE: definitions for these cataloging guidelines were compiled mainly from

Return to the Cataloging Instructions, above

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